The Kabbalah Centre Accepts Students from All Faiths and Backgrounds

In the Middle Ages the ancient teachings of the Kabbalah were finally transcribed into the text now known as the Zohar that is used by most students of this faith based teaching to learn the secrets of the universe. Ancient teachers were often keen to keep the texts hidden and used an oral tradition to pass the work on to those deemed worthy enough to learn about the mystical works included; Kabbalah is not simply a faith designed to provide information based on the beliefs of a single God or Savior, but instead asks followers to seek understanding of the world around us all.

The Kabbalah Centre has been bringing these hidden teachings to the people of the world since the 1960s after the texts of the Zohar were interpreted by a series of Jewish teachers for use in the modern world we live in. Over recent decades the work of The Kabbalah Centre has seen many celebrities and famous people explore this traditional form of Judaism in relation to their own religion or system of beliefs.

Like many teachers of the Kabbalah the traditional elements of Judaism play an important role in the work of The Kabbalah Centre, including a reliance on the practice of astrology and charms designed to protect the wearer. One of the major aspects of the religion is the wearing of a thin red thread on the left wrist that is often seen as a sign of a student of the Kabbalah; this piece of string actually plays an important role in the life of the individual as it is described by The Kabbalah Centre as a charm designed to protect the individual from harm caused by the evil eye.

The pace of modern life is often seen as one reason why increasing numbers of people are looking to explore the Kabbalah, which is based on the oldest religious teaching in the world.